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Batch Geonews: Get Your Google Glass on April 15, TopoJSON, GDAL/OGR for ArcGIS, Ukraine Maps, and much more

Sun, 04/13/2014 - 19:05

Categories:

Mapping

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

On the open source / open data front:

On the Esri front:

On the Google front:

Discussed over Slashdot:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

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Regular Session and Academic Track proposals due early next week (4/15)

Fri, 04/11/2014 - 16:52

Categories:

Mapping

April 11, 2014
Portland, OR, USA
 

Regular Session and Academic Track proposals due

A reminder to all FOSS4G attendees - the proposal submission deadline for both the Academic Track and Regular Sessions is next Tuesday, April 15th. For the Regular Sessions, we strongly recommend reviewing our advice for successful proposals before submitting.

The community voting on the Regular Sessions will directly follow the deadline, April 18th to 28th.  

Travel Grant Announcement

We realize that traveling to and attending a conference can be expensive, and that not everyone who uses or develops open source software has provided funding to pay their way or the means to pay for it themselves. To make sure that as many deserving people as possible can attend FOSS4G, we're creating a travel grant program with funds to cover registration and travel costs. Watch for details coming soon.

One additional reminder: Early Bird Registration is open!

Important Conference Dates

See the full calendar for more details.

  • April 15th: Academic Paper/Presentation Proposals Due
  • June 15th: Early bird registration ends
  • Sept 8th-9th: Workshops
  • Sept 10th-12th: Main Conference
  • Sept 13th: Code Sprint

About FOSS4G

The annual FOSS4G conference is the largest global gathering focused on open source geospatial software. FOSS4G brings together developers, users, decision-makers and observers from a broad spectrum of organizations and fields of operation. Through six days of workshops, presentations, discussions, and cooperation, FOSS4G participants create effective and relevant geospatial products, standards, and protocols.

FOSS4G has been held all over the world and draws attendees from over 40 countries. Nottingham, England hosted the conference in 2013. In 2014, Portland, Oregon, USA will host FOSS4G’s tenth year.

About OSGeo

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) was founded in 2006 to support and build the highest-quality open source geospatial software. The foundation's goal is to encourage the use and collaborative development of community-led projects, data development and education. Many projects live under the OSGeo umbrella, including FOSS4G, http://osgeo.org.

About PDX-OSGeo - Portland Area and Oregon OSGeo Chapter

The PDX-OSGeo chapter of OSGeo has been meeting, discussing and promoting the use of open source geospatial technology since 2009. Chapter members often organize or present on open source software at regional geospatial conferences. PDX is the airport code and like the PDX airport, the group has a wide catchment area.

Sponsors

 

Silver Level Sponsors

        
 

Bronze Level Sponsors

                                                        
       
 

Supporters

                                                              

 

Media Partners

These leading geospatial media organizations have partnered with FOSS4G to keep their readers informed.

                           
                           
                                      
                              
 

For more information or to keep informed from the FOSS4G Organizing Committee, follow @foss4g on Twitter, subscribe to our announcements list, or contact: foss4g2014-info@osgeo.org

Darrell Fuhriman, Chair of the FOSS4G Organizing Committee, email: darrell@garnix.org

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Historical aerial imagery covering half a century available for Switzerland via map.lubis.admin.ch

Fri, 04/11/2014 - 12:49

Categories:

Mapping

The federal office of topography swisstopo of switzerland is making over 320'000 historical aerial images dating back to the 1920 available via map.lubis.admin.ch . 160'000 of them are available in full resolution. The website is based on  map.geo.admin.ch, the federal geoportal of the swiss confederation.

Links: map.lubis.admin.ch

 

 

 

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Review of Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript by Susan Nash

Thu, 04/10/2014 - 08:54

Categories:

Mapping

It is not easy to find a GIS web app builder that takes you all the way from the basic initial steps of familiarizing yourself with HMTL, CSS, and JavaScript to fairly complicated web applications. Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript, by Eric Pimpler has two main advantages: first, you can use high-quality GIS data (or at least data that is specific to your needs), and second, you can create light apps that work quickly over a number of different devices. You’re not likely to have obsolete apps using HTML 5 and JavaScript, so it is good that the text guides you and helps you use HTML 5 and JavaScript.

The book is very logically organized, and it takes you step by step through the entire process. You start by creating a base map, and then add layers of data to the map, and then have it all display as a web page. You’re able to add different types of data layers, which include tiled, dynamic, and feature. The section on adding data layers is very robust (as it should be), and it’s followed by adding Graphics to the Map. It’s important to keep in mind that the graphics layer sits on top of the other layers – so, some data management / housekeeping / filing protocols and customs are very helpful here. In this book, the basemaps are provided by ArcGIS Online.

For a person who does not work with GIS data or ArcGIS every day, it’s probably best to work through the examples and see how they’re being developed. In that case, I’d look at chapter 8, “Turning Addresses into Points and Points into Addresses,” and then work through the example a couple of times. The chapter covers geocoding, which is at the heart of web mapping applications. It’s the way you turn physical addresses into latitude and longitude coordinates.

The book clearly demonstrates how to write and test the JavaScript code in the JavaScript Sandbox, and then it gives you a chance to practice. I also like the little tips and tricks – example, use Notepad++ instead of Notepad for coding (to avoid the extraneous code problems of Word, etc.).

In addition to Geocoding, there is a very clear and easy-to-follow chapter on using Geoprocessor, which is very good for developing models.

The appendix gives an example of using ArcGIS templates and also Dojo in order to develop user interfaces. This section alone is worth the price of the book. The instructions are very clear and the screenshots appropriate and easy to follow.

Some of the chapters contain a great deal of code and not perhaps as much detailed explanation as might be useful for people who are fairly new. It would not be a bad idea to have more call-outs in the code to point to what exactly is happening.

Overall, this is a great manual – very practical and extremely timely.

Just a last thought -- when you first read the title of the book, Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript, you may immediately ask yourself two questions: first, why ArcGIS and why not Google Earth or Google Maps integrated apps?; and second, why JavaScript?

First, ArcGIS Server is the most popular and widely-used platform for developing GIS applications for the web. It uses many different dynamic map sources, and is not tied to just one (such as Google Earth). So, if you use ArcGIS Server, you can incorporate the best possible map sources / GIS information.

Second, JavaScript works really well with modern web browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari), and it works well with HTML 5. This allows maximum flexibility with mobile applications. Using JavaScript in web applications will optimize performance because the applications are dynamic and do not have to return to the server for data. As a result, they are very responsive and use-friendly, not to mention that they are also faster.

Find more about the book here : http://www.packtpub.com/building-web-and-mobile-arcgis-server-applications-with-javascript/book

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FOSS4G Early bird registration is open, submissions due April 15th, tips for writing a good proposal

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 00:28

Categories:

Mapping

April 2, 2014
Portland, Oregon, USA  

FOSS4G Early bird registration is open, submissions due April 15th, tips for writing a good proposal

Registration for FOSS4G is now open! Early registrants will receive a discount on registration fees and the benefit of the widest variety of workshop options. (FOSS4G boasts more than 45 workshops this year as part of an excellent program.)

Attendees can wear their FOSS4G heart on their sleeve by putting a bird (badge) on it. You can also socialize with us on your platform of choice, Twitter, Google+, facebook, or tumblr.

The proposal submission deadline for both the Academic Track and Regular Sessions is April 15th. For the Regular Sessions, we strongly recommend reviewing our advice for successful proposals before submitting.

About FOSS4G

The annual FOSS4G conference is the largest global gathering focused on open source geospatial software. FOSS4G brings together developers, users, decision-makers and observers from a broad spectrum of organizations and fields of operation. Through six days of workshops, presentations, discussions, and cooperation, FOSS4G participants create effective and relevant geospatial products, standards, and protocols.

FOSS4G has been held all over the world and draws attendees from over 40 countries. Nottingham, England hosted the conference in 2013. In 2014, Portland, Oregon, USA will host FOSS4G’s tenth year.

Important Conference Dates

See the full calendar for more details.

  • April 15th: Academic Paper/Presentation Proposals Due
  • June 15th: Early bird registration ends
  • Sept 8th-9th: Workshops
  • Sept 10th-12th: Main Conference
  • Sept 13th: Code Sprint

About OSGeo

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) was founded in 2006 to support and build the highest-quality open source geospatial software. The foundation's goal is to encourage the use and collaborative development of community-led projects, data development and education. Many projects live under the OSGeo umbrella, including FOSS4G, http://osgeo.org.

About PDX-OSGeo - Portland Area and Oregon OSGeo Chapter

The PDX-OSGeo chapter of OSGeo has been meeting, discussing and promoting the use of open source geospatial technology since 2009. Chapter members often organize or present on open source software at regional geospatial conferences. PDX is the airport code and like the PDX airport, the group has a wide catchment area.

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... now HOW open is open?

Tue, 04/01/2014 - 07:54

Categories:

Mapping

Bloggage update: A lot of (virtual) ink has flowed around opening up data. Everyone is getting into the act, from White House and Whitehall (UK Cabinet Office) to the number of open data hits. In my blog and its companion catalog, I showed many examples of data uploaded, served up and linked in to my web services. 

There are however competing policies by, say, Esri and Google on how to serve up and access public data. And both limit how you can tie into them via web services. We all support a free and open web, but  #freeandopen means different things to different people. This blog and its companion catalog are dedicated to truly opening up web mapping.

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Batch Geonews: PyQGIS Book, More GeoGit, Android Wear, Sub-meter Bathymetry, Google Maps Supports GeoJSON, and much more

Mon, 03/24/2014 - 14:44

Categories:

Mapping

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

Geo-related discussions over Slashdot:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

Google Plus One

Testing web map APIs - Google vs OpenLayers vs Leaflet

Mon, 03/24/2014 - 13:34

Categories:

Mapping

Geospatial technologies evolve quickly, here's a fresh comparison of web mapping API and libraries, Testing web map APIs - Google vs OpenLayers vs Leaflet.

From the conclusion: "Google, for example, can easily insert adverts into its maps without us knowing. Leaflet and OpenLayers, being open source, cannot. That said, if your aim is just to get attractive 'off the shelf' maps up quickly, Google Maps is a good option. OpenLayers is mature and big and works well with servers. Leaflet, as the new kid on the block is the most exciting for me and encapsulates many of the benefits of open source software in general: speed of development, flexibility, efficiency. [...] Lightness considered, for me that would mean Leaflet for many applications, but watch this space for the final version of OpenLayers3 (due very soon) and perhaps even better web mapping options."

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EPSG.io - Find Coordinate Systems Worldwide

Fri, 03/21/2014 - 13:15

Categories:

Mapping

Lots of us need to find datum / CRS info from time to time, and there's a new website to help us:  EPSG.io: Find Coordinate Systems Worldwide. The whole website and content is open source.

The main features according to the announcement:

  • Fulltext search for the complete database of coordinate systems from EPSG
  • Short rememberable URLs, i.e. http://epsg.io/4326
  • Type GPS latitude/longitude and get projected coordinates or vice versa
  • Precise numerical location on a map / aerial photo for any place on the planet
  • Export definitions in various formats, including WKT, OGC GML, XML, Proj.4, SQL, JS, etc.
  • Facets for retrieval of alternative record types from the official EPSG database
  • API for the search in EPSG database and for transformations

There already was spatialreference.org offering a similar service, the FAQ in the announcement explains how EPSG.io differs.

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GeoServer 2.5 Released

Fri, 03/21/2014 - 12:51

Categories:

Mapping

GeoServer is one of the most popular web mapping / web services server, and it just got to version 2.5.

The key features according to the announcement:

  • WCS 2.0 and WCS 2.0 Earth Observation have been added
  • The addition of a batch importer to making setting up GeoServer easier
  • High performance PNG encoder based on PNGJ library (Andrea Aime). Improved JPEG performance using libjpegturbo available as an optional extension
  • Use of ST_Simplify to improve PostGIS rendering performance
  • New implementation of GetFeatureInfo that takes into account symbol shapes, offsets, and dynamic line widths into account

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pycsw 1.8.0 released

Fri, 03/21/2014 - 12:08

Categories:

Mapping

The pycsw team proudly announces the release of pycsw 1.8.0 codenamed "data.gov". This release powers the data.gov CSW endpoints (http://catalog.data.gov/csw). data.gov is the home of the U.S. Government's open data.

The 1.8.0 release brings significant features, enhancements and fixes to the codebase, including:

  •  support for PostgreSQL Full Text Search
  •  support for repository filtering (http://pycsw.org/docs/1.8.0/repofilters.html)
  •  support for PostgreSQL schemas other than 'public'
  •  implement database connection pooling for WSGI
  •  more robust native model
  •  fix csw:AnyText population to be finer grained for OGC data services
  •  fix UTF-8 handling in configuration

The full list of enhancements and bug fixes is available here. pycsw is an OGC CSW server implementation written in Python. pycsw fully implements the OpenGIS Catalogue Service Implementation Specification (Catalogue Service for the Web). Initial development started in 2010 (more formally announced in 2011). The project is certified OGC Compliant, and is an OGC Reference Implementation. pycsw allows for the publishing and discovery of geospatial metadata. Existing repositories of geospatial metadata can also be exposed via OGC:CSW 2.0.2, providing a standards-based metadata and catalogue component of spatial data infrastructures. pycsw is Open Source, released under an MIT license, and runs on all major platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac OS X). The source code is available here. Testers and developers are welcome. The pycsw developer team.

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Releasing data really works, Part VI

Wed, 03/19/2014 - 05:30

Categories:

Mapping

Bloggage update: Three months into posting data on my web service, I created a short list of free data for Great Britain on my Map Catalog called GB Freebie. While that post details the offering, let's review here some lessons learned in using Mapcentia stack on AWS. It further illustrates how relatively easy it is to post freely available datasets "with a little help from my friends"... So go ahead and explore more from many other free data sources!

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Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript

Tue, 03/18/2014 - 14:25

Categories:

Mapping

Hello,

I am happy to announce that my new book Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript has been published by Packt Publishing and is available in hard copy and eBook formats.

ArcGIS Server is the leading software for developing both web and mobile GIS applications. There are a number of programming languages that you can use to develop applications with ArcGIS Server including JavaScript, Flex, and Silverlight. However, the ArcGIS API for JavaScript is the preferred way of developing your custom applications for ArcGIS Server since it can be used for both web and mobile application development. It’s easy to use and doesn’t require the use of a browser plugin.

This tutorial-based guide provides you with hands-on experience in developing custom web and mobile ArcGIS Server applications with step-by-step style exercises. Along with introducing you to the HTML/CSS/JavaScript technology stack, you will learn to add intuitive geographic layers of information to your map, interactive query and display of spatial data, add user interface widgets, access geoprocessing tasks, and many more in your own web and mobile GIS applications.

With this practical, hands-on guide, you will be able to develop fully-functional online GIS applications with ArcGIS Server using the ArcGIS API for JavaScript. After creating your own map, you will explore how to add geographic layers from a variety of sources including tiled and dynamic map services, add graphics to the map, and stream geographic features to the browser using a FeatureLayer.

Most applications include the specific functionalities implemented by ArcGIS Server as tasks. You’ll learn how to use the various tasks provided by ArcGIS Server including spatial and attribute queries, identification of features, finding features by attribute, and more. Geocoding and geoprocessing tasks are covered in-depth to help you accomplish your task in GIS. Finally, you’ll learn just how easy it is to integrate ArcGIS.com content into your custom developed applications.

This comprehensive guide quickly advances through probing programmatic techniques for building web and mobile GIS applications which will make application development a lot easier!

If you are a web or mobile application developer, who wants to create GIS applications in your respective platform, this book is ideal for you. You will need Java Script programming experience to get the most out of this book. Although designed as an introductory to intermediate level book, it will also be useful for more advanced developers who are new to the topic of developing applications with ArcGIS Server.

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The GeoCloud2 (GC2) server is now available as VMDK file

Sat, 03/15/2014 - 14:20

Categories:

Mapping

The GeoCloud2 (GC2) server is now available as VMDK file for use in VMWare products, Oracle VirtualBox etc. The image works out of the box, just call the IP address of the newly created virtual server in a web browser.

GC2 is a open source project that ties PostGIS, MapServer, TileCache, WFS, WMS, OpenLayers and Leaflet together in one integrated geospatial solution. 

We’ve also put a basic GeoServer install on the image. Just call http://[server]:8080/geoserver/web/

Get the VMDK file

Read more about GC2

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Announcing FOSS4G 2014 in Portland, Oregon, September 8th-13th and Media Partnership

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 12:18

Categories:

Mapping

We're glad to announce that Slashgeo is once again a proud media partner of the FOSS4G 2014 conference, to be held in Portland, Oregon (USA) on September 8th to the 13th. Please find here the FOSS4G 2014 calls for workshops, presentations and academic papers.

"The annual FOSS4G conference is the largest global gathering for all those currently or potentially working with open source geospatial software. It brings together a mix of developers, users, decision makers and observers from a broad spectrum of organizations and fields of operation for six days of workshops, presentations, discussions, and cooperation.

Conference Dates

Sep 8th-9th: Workshops
Sep 10th-12th: Main Conference
Sep 13th: Code Sprint"

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FOSS4G-Europe Welcoming Contributions

Tue, 03/11/2014 - 12:11

Categories:

Mapping

Independent software developers, scientists, industry experts, and agency representatives will come to meet at the FOSS4-Europe conference held in Bremen, Germany from July 15 to 17. Contributions can now be submitted on the conference website www.foss4g-e.org/ until April 15.

Under this year’s motto “Independent Innovation for INSPIRE, Big Data and citizen participation” the conference series FOSS4G-Europe (Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial - Europe) is uniting the GIS community from a broad spectrum of fields like geodesy, geo information, land management, and remote sensing. Industry and public authorities are expressly invited as they increasingly realize value and economic potential of free and open source products.

Several additional events make the FOSS4G-Europe in Bremen a unique event. A public viewing of the soccer World Championship final will kick off a week packed with events. The week will open with a workshop “Big Geo Data & INSPIRE” especially targeted at public authorities. INSPIRE Annex II and III will be discussed in relation to the pertaining standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium. Canadian Jeff McKenna, President of the OSGEO Foundation, will open the event with his keynote talk. As a charter member McKenna has got involved with spreading and usage of open-source software for geo information systems for many years. In a plenary, the winners of the international academic NASA World Wind Challenge Europe programming contest will be announced and honored at the conference.

Being in the tradition of the worldwide FOSS4G conference series, this event will bring together open-source experts and enthusiasts from all over Europe and beyond creating a unique, visionary atmosphere.

Conference Dates:

General presentations and workshops:

  • Abstract submission: 2014-apr-15
  • Review notification: 2014-apr-30
  • Conference: 2014-jul-13

Scientific Track:

  • Abstract submission: 2014-apr-15
  • Full paper submission: 2014-apr-22
  • Review notification: 2014-may-15
  • Camera ready version: 2014-jun-15
  • Conference: 2014-jul-13

Early bird registration deadline: 2014-may-22

 

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Geospatial Advancement Canada 2014 (2)

Thu, 03/06/2014 - 01:27

Categories:

Mapping

On Day 2 and 3 at the Geospatial Advancement Canada 2014, speakers were putting emphasis on new opportunities of collaboration, actions and technology development aligned with the need for a new Geomatics business strategy plan for Canada based on the initiatives emerging elsewhere (e.g. INSIPIRE, US Geospatial Platform Business Plan and Strategic Plan 2014-2016).

Here are some of the main speakers and key elements of presentations held on Tuesday and Wednesday:

  • Walter Natynczyk and Denis Robert presents the upcoming Radarsat Constellation Mission (RCM) which will include 4 Radarsat satellites (1 Radarsat-2 & 3 RCM) for the target date of 2018. This new Canadian Space mission will give 2 to 4 coverage capability per day over the Arctic region and a daily coverage almost elsewhere on Earth, with still spotlight (1 X 3 m) as the best resolution. With 5 to 7 minutes images processing time frame for unclassified content, multiple applications might continue to arise on the market, especially for Space-based Maritime Domain Awareness for National Defense surveillance (e.g. best Open Ocean capability, 25 m ship detection), Ice monitoring (actually the biggest consumer of Radarsat-2 imagery) and Emergency management (e.g. flood monitoring, maritime search and rescue). This mission is also open to international collaboration from the European and US Space agencies.
  • Industry leaders of “pixels” openly discussed new products coming to the market, such as PlanetLabs or SkyBox Imaging and the possible change of imagery-resolution restrictions (better than 50 cm). This industry has improved its range of services by innovation and to deliver better product other than just images, such as effective cloud-based service, automated extraction tool, Web Map / Coverage / Image Processing and Tile as a Services. Satellite technology has also been able to compete with the emergence in the civilian world of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) or known as Drones. Most of the speakers were agreed that UAV’s is complementary to satellite and more adapted to middle-size area, data on-demand and target area rapidly, when good regulation are put in place.
  • Mladen Stojic inspire the crowd with geospatial actions to be taken on two main subjects: spatial analysis and effective way of finding geospatial assets. From the spatial analysis perspectives, suggested actions should be taken to improve result’s communication derived from automated spatial analytics, streamline analysis and modeling, as well as building new Web Geoprocessing Service (WPS) to benefit fully of this current open, real-time, distributed and connected dynamic world. On the subject of finding geospatial assets, actions needed to be made to benefit from the richness of information related to “data is everywhere” trends by searching in comprehensive metadata by the “BBOX philosophy” using intelligent crawlers connected to federated geo-catalog. This simple BBOX target mixed using a network of web services were amongst the solutions of solving “big data everywhere” issues to “find best, up-to-date and needed data now”.

Based on this first Geospatial Advancement Canada 2014, Canadian industry is in a good position on the “location” global world. It has being said by Mohamed Abousalem of Tecterra: the Geomatics economic sector in Canada (because of its large territory and low density of people) representing over 20% on the global market, 2.8 billions revenue, 2500 companies, 35 000 employees and has a 15% annual growth. In this context, a clear National strategy for the years to come needs to connect all those assets together. However, the Geomatics Canadian community is at critical stage (e.g. Tecterra 2010-2014, GEOIDE and GeoConnections programs are ended) and needs to initiate a new cycle of development to reinvented himself. If this community still want to keep up his good position on this competitive market, it needs new intelligent and agile collaboration / partnership models to stay one of the top leaders and continue to build upon what has been accomplished by the missed Roger Tomlinson (Canadian inventor of modern Geographic Information System) and others since 1960’s. Thanks to this first Geospatial Advancement Canada edition, with its more than 140 participants, for having discussion and identifying challenge related to the role of Geospatial Intelligence and Geomatics managers in the development of a new Strategy that is looking ahead to build a new cycle.

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HD Video of Earth From Space Brings Maps to Life

Wed, 03/05/2014 - 13:59

Categories:

Mapping

We knew this was coming, and now it's here. Wired shares an article named Incredible HD Video of Earth From Space Brings Maps to Life. We enter in a new era of space-based remote sensing. You can also learn more directly from Skybox's HD video website. What isn't clear to me at this point is the current delay they can offer between capture of the video and the delivery to customer - this delay will certainly shorten over time.

From the Wired article: "The video above was taken by a satellite, from space. It has enough resolution to watch individual cars move down the road and identify specific planes at the Beijing airport. The footage is from Skybox Imaging, a company that has just started offering customers 90-second video of any point on Earth from its SkySat-1 satellite, upping the ability to monitor what’s going on down here on Earth from space. [...] “What’s exciting now is being able to put the video directly on a map,” said Mapbox CEO Eric Gunderson. “They’re an awesome data source, and we have an awesome API that can digest that data.” [...] “What’s exciting now is being able to put the video directly on a map,” said Mapbox CEO Eric Gunderson. “They’re an awesome data source, and we have an awesome API that can digest that data.”"

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Geospatial Advancement Canada 2014 (1)

Tue, 03/04/2014 - 00:45

Categories:

Mapping

This Monday started the Geospatial Advancement Canada 2014 conference. The conference aims at discussing Geospatial trends around a National Geospatial Strategy for Canada.

If you would like to follow the conference discussion on Twitter, search this tag: #gcan14.

Here are some of the main speakers and key elements of presentations held on Monday:

  • Major General Christian Rousseau explain the role of its GeoSpatial Intelligence Group that needs to find ways of spending less time looking for information and more time for geospatial analysis;
  • Julie Lefevbre expose the main projects of R&D in Defense & Security such as Arctic Intelligence and situation awareness (e.g. MASAS) in Canada, but also what she sees as the future of cloud-based architecture that might be built on collaboration (e.g. Virtual USA, US GeoSpatial platform) and knowledge;
  • Steeve Guillemette present the case of health crisis management in Québec City during legionnaires disease outbreak and how geospatial analytics become the main integrator of information gathered by specialist;
  • Gido Langen explain how he sees 3rd Generation of Web Mapping: establishing a network of REST end points, as the effective way of providing resources to increase quality control and improve capacity of apps deployment;
  • Richard Akerman and Deena Yanofsky identifies current limitations of most of Open Data portal which undermines standardization (e.g. common licence such as the International Creative Common 4.0, stable & unique Digital Object Identifier, etc.) and lack of intermediate tools (less developer centric) for vizualisation and spatial analysis (that might help to decrease data illiteracy & improve data skills of the general public);
  • Trevor Taylor expose his own definition of Big Data (e.g. Volume+Velocity+Veracity+Variety) and what OGC is promoting: One Open Architecture and Open Standards (e.g. not just OGC, but OASIS, W3C, Web3D) and what are the recent emphasis of OGC: Open Mobile, Internet of Things, cloud computing and privacy.

Based on the presentations made on Monday, the concept toward "built in collaboration" and "Service Oriented Architecture" is likely to be the way of doing things in the GeoSpatial world, in which at the same time the development of open and big data seems to overwhelm GIS managers and public users, but challenges the data skills of the tech guys for the good!

Slashgeo as media partner of this event will publish other articles this week on other hot topics of the conference.

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Will the UK Environment Agency release its geodata?

Sat, 03/01/2014 - 08:32

Categories:

Mapping

Following extensive flooding in the UK there is increasing pressure on the Environment Agency, the government agency tasked with national flood protection, to release open data rather than charging licence fees. These are major geo datasets which effect much of the UK population.

A 'Floodhack' hack day was held at Google Campus, London 16 Feb in conjunction with the EA, the Open Data Institute, and the Cabinet Office. This gained a lot of mainstream press such as the BBC and The Guardian.

During the hack the EA released some of its flood warning feeds for 3 months. Now there are calls by open data activists to go further.

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