Datablog (the Guardian)

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The top 100 baby names in England and Wales in 2013

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 09:53

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Visualization

Amelia remains the top name for girls while Oliver takes over from Harry as the most popular moniker for boys. Have a look at our breakdown and read the list in full

Oliver has taken Harrys crown as the top name parents choice for their baby boys in 2013. That year saw an extra 6,949 children called Oliver in England and Wales.

Amelia, which has been the popular girls name since 2011, regains the top yet again with 5,570 babies. That year, coincidentally perhaps, was the first year that Amy Pond appeared in Doctor Who.

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A-level results 2014: key numbers in Vines

Thu, 08/14/2014 - 15:51

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Visualization

Want to see the A-level 2014 results summarised in mere seconds? Take a look at the key numbers from the results in these animated clips

A-level results are out and the 2014 figures show that despite a rise in the proportion of exam entries awarded an A*, the percentage of students achieving A* to E dropped to 98% from 98.1% in 2013.

Weve picked out some key numbers from the results, as published by the Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) and put them into short animated clips. You might already be familiar with #datavines (debuted by Mona Chalabi and Hannah Waldram on the Datablog last year) but if not, take a look and let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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A-level results 2014: the full breakdown

Thu, 08/14/2014 - 12:06

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Visualization

The overall A-level pass rate has gone down. Find out how students fared in different subjects and whether females beat males to the better grades

DATA: get the full spreadsheet

A-level results are out and it is the first time the proportion of students being awarded A* to E has dropped in 32 years - although by just 0.1 percentage points.

The number of students receiving an A* grade went up by 0.6 percentage points but there were decreases for every grade below that.

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Do your A-level grades really matter?

Thu, 08/14/2014 - 08:54

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Visualization

Some teenagers across the country are celebrating their A-level results while others are being consoled. Research shows that it may not be the grades you get but the subjects you do that matter to your future earnings

Students up and down the country will today be collecting their A-level results. While those that perform as well as they expected will receive slaps on the back and congratulations, there will inevitably some who will feel disappointed by how they did.

Its tempting to look at whether grades matter and most of the analysis and coverage will focus on this. However, research shows that it is not necessarily the grades you get but the subjects you take that might be making a difference to your future earnings.

In England, more students take drama/theatre studies and sociology at Alevel than economics; yet in 2007, the University of Nottingham admitted more than three times as many students with economics than either drama/theatre studies or sociology (Fazackerley and Chant 2008). In the same year, the University of Oxford accepted more students with an Alevel in Latin than business studies, law, psychology and sociology combined (Fazackerley and Chant 2008).

Teachers should offer advice and guidance to students that are in the best interests of the students. Schools must resist the temptation of pushing students towards soft subjects merely to improve their own sets of examination results and their positions in school league tables.

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Cardiovascular disease worse in regional, rural areas - map

Wed, 08/13/2014 - 14:01

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Visualization

A new analysis from the Heart Foundation shows that Australians living outside metropolitan areas have higher rates of cardiovascular disease than those in metropolitan areas. Here, we have used the results to produce an interactive map. You can zoom in to regions of interest, or click or hover over an area to get specific information.

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What is the state of mental health in England and Wales?

Wed, 08/13/2014 - 12:27

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Visualization

Around 16% of adults have a common mental disorder. Find out more about how these conditions are affecting England and Wales

The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) in 2007 was the most comprehensive look at how many people were suffering from mental health issues at that time in England and Wales.

Mental health is chronically underfunded. It accounts for 28% of the disease burden, but gets just 13% of the NHS budget. Mental health services are straining at the seams and these new cuts will mean support is slashed in response to instructions from NHS England.

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Sentencing criminals: how Australia's states and territories compare

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 03:23

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Visualization

Victoria has recently legislated to increase the average sentence handed down for serious crimes, so how do the states and territories differ in how they punish those they convict?

The Victorian government has passed laws to increase the average sentence for a range of crimes, including murder and various child abuse offences.

It said the reforms would ensure that those found guilty of murder, large-scale commercial drug trafficking, culpable driving causing death and child sex offences would face big increases in sentences.

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Hacking democracy nine interesting GovHack projects

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 06:21

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Visualization

An app that tells you which plants grow in your area, a government department party game and a system to notify search-and-rescue teams of your planned trips were among the winners at this years GovHack event.

GovHack is (probably) Australias largest hackathon, an event that involves teams of programmers and designers competing to come up with novel ways to use government data over the course of a weekend.

The teams compete for cash prizes in various categories, such as best digital humanities hack and best social inclusion hack.

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Warrantless metadata access is already taking place at higher rate than ever

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 23:29

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Visualization

A multitude of agencies currently have access to metadata and in 2012-13 used those powers on 330,640 occasions

Given the current debate about metadata retention in Australia its worth pointing out that various organisations can access your metadata already, without a warrant and its occurring at a higher rate than ever before.

In mid 2013 we wrote about how agencies from the police to the RSPCA to the Victorian Taxi Directorate are able to access existing information or documents from telecommunications companies without a warrant. The information can include details of phone calls (but not the contents of the call) and internet access details such as subscribers personal information, and dates and times of internet usage.

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Six-year-olds outstrip adults in digital understanding but teens lead the way

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 18:00

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Visualization

The millennium generation have the most digital confidence and knowledge say Ofcom in its latest communications market report. What else does it tell us?

An average six-year-old has the same knowledge of technology as a 45-year old, according to the latest Ofcom communications market report.

As well as the usual media and technology insights that the annual release offers, this year the report by the industry regulator has also attempted to pinpoint which age group are the most digitally confident and knowledgeable, using a calculated digital quotient (DQ) score.

Among six- to seven-year-olds, who have grown up with YouTube, Spotify music streaming and the BBC iPlayer, the average DQ (digital quotient) score was 98, higher than for those aged between 45 and 49, who scored an average of 96. Digital understanding peaks between 14 and 15, with a DQ of 113 and then drops gradually throughout adulthood, before falling rapidly in old age

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Australian politics becoming more polarised

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 03:13

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Visualization

Labor, Greens and informal voters move to the left while Liberal voters stay put and Nationals move to the right

Australians are becoming more polarised in their political beliefs as Labor, Greens and informal voters move to the left while Liberal voters stay put and National voters move to the right.

Inspired by Pew Researchs look at political polarisation in the US, weve crunched the numbers on Australian voters using the Australian Electoral Study survey (AES).

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London gets 24 times as much spent on infrastructure per resident than north-east England

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 23:01

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Visualization

In the week when George Osborne claimed he was championing investment in the north, analysis of spending shows that Londons population receive far more than anybody else

The size of the investment gap between London and the rest of England was made stark by new analysis showing Crossrail alone is earmarked to receive nine times more funding than all the rail projects from the Norths three regions combined.

Figures derived from a research report by IPPR, show Londoners receive £5,203 more per head on capital investment than people in the north-east a discrepancy sure to reignite a long-running row on whether Londons growth is coming at the detriment of the rest of the UK.

To end the imbalance in the UK economy so our success is not wholly dependent on the global city of London, so we have across the north of England individual cities that are better connected, have a better quality of life, and are able to create

Effective infrastructure is the bedrock of an effective and efficient economy. Transport connections, flood defences and high-speed broadband networks all allow people and goods to move quickly from place to place and for business to flourish. It is widely recognised that the North of England loses out as government spending on infrastructure is continuously skewed towards London.

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European card fraud reached new high in 2013

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 16:27

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Visualization

According to the latest data, European card fraud reached a new high with France and the UK suffering 62% of the total losses of the countries examined

European card fraud losses reached a new high in 2013, with the UK and France suffering 62% of the total losses of the 19 countries analysed.

Using data provided by Euromonitor, the Fico evolution of fraud map attempts to paint a picture of the fraud landscape across Europe, in particular the change between 2006 and 2013.

When fraud losses peaked in 2008, UK issuers sharply reduced card fraud through fraud analytics and the introduction of chip and PIN. However, criminals have been adapting pickpocketing after watching consumers input their PIN, or calling cardholders and purporting to be part of a banks fraud team, when actually they are stealing card details.

Meanwhile in France, chip and PIN has been used for so long that criminals have completely changed their approach and reverted to ID theft, which accounted for 66% of French fraud losses in 2013. Its growth has been quite staggering losses due to ID theft grew from 7.6m in 2006 to 284m in 2013

Fraud is like a balloon squeeze it in one place and it bulges somewhere else

Euromonitor Internationals consumer finance research process encompasses desk research, trade research, industry specialisation and company analysis. In conjunction with secondary source material, Euromonitor analysts engage with the industry via trade discussions. These discussions with all levels of the consumer finance ecosystem serve as a critical component as they provide inputs during early stage construction of estimates and later in the process market consensus on pre-publication figures. An internal audit apparatus screens the data at national, regional and global levels before publication on the Passport database.

For value lost to fraud, analysts consult publicly available sources including but not limited to official sources (e.g., central banks) and trade press. Analysts may also utilize the trade discussion network for insight on fraud within a particular market. Euromonitor International does not conduct its own consumer survey as an element of its research of fraud. Inputs gleaned from initial primary and secondary review are synthesized and retested against market consensus during trade discussions.

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Salmond vs Darling: the poll results in charts

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:21

Categories:

Visualization

Alastair Darling beat Alex Salmond in the Scottish independence referendum debate according to a Guardian/ICM poll. What do the results look like broken down in detail?

The Scottish independence referendum debate last night was a clear success for Alastair Darling instead of SNP leader Alex Salmond. In a Guardian/ICM poll of 512 Scottish voters after the debate Darling won 56% to 44% (when dont knows were excluded).

Looking at the poll results in more detail it shows that the Scottish National Party leader was only judged as winning the debate by a few select groups such as 35-54 year olds, among SNP voters and those who are going to vote yes in the referendum.

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Is the Central line really as long as Manchester to Leeds?

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 13:48

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Visualization

This morning chancellor George Osborne said that if the Central line was laid across the Pennines it would connect Manchester and Leeds. Is that right and how useful is the point?

George Osborne has backed £15bn worth of investment in infrastructure in the north of England including a trans-Pennine rail route.

One of the ways he chose to express his backing of the plan was this seemingly illuminating illustration of geography:

If you laid the Central line across the Pennines it would actually connect Manchester and Leeds.

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John Venn Google doodle: the right way to do a Venn diagram

Mon, 08/04/2014 - 19:13

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Visualization

Google have got it right with their new doodle venerating the 180th birthday of John Venn. Here are a few examples to show you how you can get it right

Hull-born John Venn, creator of the eponymous diagram, was born 180 years ago today and to celebrate Google have created an interactive doodle of the famous data visualisation.

The concept of the Venn is simple. In each section (in most cases represented as a circle) you have one limited collection of things. In the Google example above one of those is vegetation so all trees, plants, flowers etc. and the other is mythical. The overlapping section can contain all the logical relations between those two sets.

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Gay men have sex when drunk. <em>And</em ?

Fri, 08/01/2014 - 14:09

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Visualization

The Gay Times new figures on gay mens sexual habits while taking drugs clashes with more rigorous research

Hold the front page. BBC Newsbeat, the Huffington Post, PinkNews and others have reported this morning that sex among gay men has been linked to drink and drugs.

The story is based on a survey into drug use carried out by Gay Times magazine last month. They surveyed 1,000 of their readers online about their use of alcohol and drugs as well as their sexual behaviour.

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