Datablog (the Guardian)

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Updated: 1 day 36 min ago

The history of global economics... in football shirts

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 12:44

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Visualization

West Ham’s sponsor Alpari FX trading have gone bust after the Swiss Franc rocketed in value. This is just one example of how the sponsors on Premier League shirts have mirrored the market shifts of the past two decades

From Japanese electronics to reckless banks and middle eastern airlines, the fate of Premier League shirt sponsors has been tied closely to that of the world economy. West Ham United was the latest club to be sideswiped by the financial markets this month when its main commercial backer, foreign exchange dealer Alpari, was forced into administration by the Swiss central bank suddenly abandoning the Swiss franc’s peg against the euro.

It is the second time the east end team has been caught offside by global events, having lost XL Airways in 2008 when the UK carrier - its backers caught up in the Icelandic banking meltdown - collapsed in the same month as the Lehman Brothers implosion.

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We crunch the Asian Cup numbers. How significant is home ground advantage?

Wed, 01/21/2015 - 03:38

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Visualization

Historically, playing on home soil has benefitted the host nation at Asian Cups but how much encouragement can the Socceroos take from that this year?

It’s been a long time since a team has lifted the Asian Cup on home soil. Five tournaments and more than two decades have gone by since it last happened, at Hiroshima’s Big Arch Stadium in 1992.

That’s a daunting statistic for Australia, runners-up four years ago and hosts of the current tournament, which concludes in Sydney at the end of this month. They might have been hoping a bit of home ground advantage could get them over the line this time around, but seemingly, despite playing in the biggest and most diverse of Fifa’s confederations, that advantage is limited.

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Global unemployment forecast to hit 212m – country by country breakdown

Tue, 01/20/2015 - 10:51

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Visualization

Global unemployment is forecast to reach 212m people by 2019, according to the ILO. But the report from the organisation highlights regional differences

The number of people that are unemployed will continue to rise over the next five years warns the International Labour Organisation (ILO), with the number of jobless forecast to reach more than 212m by 2019.

The unemployment rate though is expected to remain stable at 5.9% until 2019 when it is forecast to dip to 5.8%.

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Greece Election 2015: the politics and economics in numbers

Tue, 01/20/2015 - 08:00

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Visualization

From the election polls to government debt - here’s a look at the figures behind the Greek election

Following the Greek parliament’s failure to select a new president at the end of last year, early elections were called for 25 January. Having topped last year’s European parliament elections, the radical left and anti-austerity party Syriza is ahead in the polls. Syriza wants to renegotiate the terms of Greece’s bailout deal. Many analysts believe the election, which outgoing prime minister Antonis Samaras of the centre-right party New Democracy (ND) has described as a referendum on Europe, could drag the eurozone back into a crisis.

SYRIZA's poll lead consistent but parliamentary majority elusive http://t.co/IIEUGC0zgA #Greece #politics pic.twitter.com/MeIUidVbb7

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Le rebound - Hollande's popularity rises 21 points in one month

Mon, 01/19/2015 - 17:10

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Visualization

From the Fifth Republic’s most unpopular president to the single highest ever monthly spike in a French poll: following the attack on Charlie Hebdo, the popularity of France’s president bounces back to levels last seen in the months following his election

The approval rating of President François Hollande has gone up by 21 percentage points following the terrorist attack on the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris. This is the single highest month-on-month bounce ever recorded for a sitting president by the polling firm Ifop.

In the latest monthly Paris Match poll 40% of French people approved of the president. The figure is at its highest since the months that followed Hollande’s election victory in 2012.

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How UK cities compare for population, jobs, new businesses and house prices

Mon, 01/19/2015 - 00:01

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Visualization

The Centre for Cities’ 2015 Cities Outlook report highlights the widening gap between the UK’s best and worst performing cities, comparing average earnings, qualifications, broadband speeds and more

The gap between cities in the south and the rest of the UK has widened over the past 10 years, according to a Centre for Cities analysis of Britain’s 64 largest cities which draws on a decade of official data, despite stated efforts by the last two governments to bridge the north-south divide and rebalance the economy.

The Cities Outlook report finds cities in the south are out-performing those in the rest of the country in terms of population growth and in the number of jobs and businesses created.

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Four ways Labour has had a better start to 2015 than the Tories

Fri, 01/16/2015 - 11:59

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Visualization

On the face of it, the new political year kicked off with the same tune with which 2014 ended, but amidst the noise there are a few signals favourable to Labour

On the face of it, the new political year kicked off with the same tune on which 2014 faded out. The Conservatives took to the road to convince voters that Britain needed to stay on the path to a stronger economy, Labour meanwhile called on voters to help defend the NHS from the Tories.

But under the surface of Twitter spats between the two main parties’ press accounts, and a raging debate about debates, early indications are that Labour has had a better start to 2015 than the Conservatives.

The coalition moves to its worst ever rating in YouGov's "blame for the cuts" tracker - up 4% since December pic.twitter.com/oqtxPDAY8Y

Ed Miliband winning over future voters, one Instagram comment at a time. pic.twitter.com/o4Q04t6Uqm

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Queensland reimagined: see the state resized by the statistics that matter

Fri, 01/16/2015 - 04:50

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Visualization

This interactive cartogram allows you to resize electorates by statistics from the 2011 census and the outcome of the 2012 Queensland election. You can, for example, resize by population to see all the smaller, metropolitan electorates on the same scale as the larger regional divisions. You can also re-colour electorates by each statistic to view trends across two indicators at once.

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​Is Triple J’s hottest 100 getting more mainstream?

Thu, 01/15/2015 - 20:00

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Our analysis of the crossover between the popular music charts and the hottest 100 addresses the oft-heard complaint that Triple J is selling out

It’s almost hottest 100 time again in Australia, and with comes it all the associated discussion.

Questions like: is there too much electronic music? Will the winner be a bland, middle-of-the-road rock act? Was it all better 20 years ago? Is Richard Kingsmill part of some Illuminati-like secret society dedicated to preventing my band from achieving greatness?

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UK election 2015: seven seats where the non-UK born are crucial

Thu, 01/15/2015 - 13:42

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Visualization

Voters from Commonwealth countries and Ireland can register to vote. Using census data we can see where in England and Wales they most influence the electoral outcome

British citizens aren’t the only ones with voting rights in the upcoming general election. Those aged 18 or over from the Commonwealth and the Irish republic that are resident in the country will also be able to cast a ballot.

As the electoral register is updated monthly instead of annually, as Migration Watch pointed out last year, this means that newly arrived citizens could potentially be able to vote within the month they arrive.

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Council cuts: the burden falls again on the north and the inner cities

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 12:50

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Visualization

Poorer Labour-voting areas face bigger spending reductions than wealthy Tory shires, according to two critical analyses of the 2015-16 local authority funding settlement

The most deprived councils continue to see the biggest cuts in government funding, with traditionally Labour-voting areas in the north of England and inner city London losing out the most, according to an analysis of the 2015-16 town hall funding settlement.

The study by Newcastle-upon-Tyne city council claims that leafy shire areas in the Tory-voting south-east are again more protected against the cuts than their northern and urban counterparts, debunking ministerial claims that they had delivered a settlement that is “fair to all parts of the country”.

The Government’s claim to be fair to councils in all parts of the country is complete bunkum.

[The true figure should include] funding that councils have available to meet their priorities and fund existing staff and commitments and which is not already ring-fenced for other use. This includes Revenue Support Grant, retained business rates, council tax and a number of special grants that authorities are free to spend as they wish. In contrast [the government’s] measure also includes Public Health Grant (which can only be spent on public health matters) and the Better Care Fund (which is largely NHS money or budgets that local authorities have pooled with the NHS, and can only be spent on priorities agreed with local NHS managers).

While closer co-operation between local authorities and the NHS is fundamental to better outcomes in social care, to portray money already spent through pooled budgets as extra funding is seriously distorting, not least because the same money appears to be counted as NHS funding as well. The figures presented by the Government also appear to hide the true impact of cuts upon some local authorities. Once you peer behind the opaque measurement of funding used today, you see that the disparity of impact across the country and between different types of authority is significant and needs to be considered carefully by policy makers.

The heat maps we produce uncannily resemble the political map of the country showing that the Government is presiding over a wholesale shift of resources predominantly from the north to the south of England.

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Download deathmatch: compare internet speed worldwide

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 01:33

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Visualization

How fast would a photo download in Swaziland? How reliable is the average internet connection in Australia? Select two countries to see how the average speed and quality affects different situations. Internet quality data is only available for countries marked with an asterisk*. Data is updated daily.

This is a re-styled version of an interactive which was originally published in 2013, updated to fit our new site layout

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German anti-immigration party Pegida is still only a minor force

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 16:40

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Visualization

Pegida’s march last night attracted 25,000 marchers to the streets of Dresden but the overall political landscape of Germany is still very moderate

Patric Europeans Against the Islamization of the West (Pegida) have caused a stir in Germany over the last few months, with thousands taking part in their marches in Dresden.

Just a few hundred people attended their initial rallies in October, but that number has swelled with 25,000 attending on Monday. The march before that on 5 January, attracted 18,000.

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What emojis do people tweet at Nigel Farage?

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 09:31

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Visualization

Applause for Nigel Farage and winks for David Cameron? See which emojis are being sent to politicians

Emojis. Whether you <3 them or they make you feel :(, they have grown and grown since their invention in Japan around the turn of the century.

Although it may be too much to call 2015 the first emoji election (or emojilection), this is probably the first time that leaders have come face-to-smiley-face with their electorate in such a way.

Entertaining, but this strikes me as someone having a bit too much time on their hands! http://t.co/eAhCBLKF60

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Two very different UK election polls - we should ignore them both

Mon, 01/12/2015 - 17:37

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Visualization

One UK election poll released today has the Conservative party ahead by six, another poll has Labour leading by five. While the temptation to focus on one’s preferred political flavour may be strong, it is always best to look at the trends instead

The first poll of 2015 by Lord Ashcroft has the Conservatives leading by six points. David Cameron’s party is up four points since last month. Labour is down three, on 28%.

National Poll (Lord Ashcroft) 09 - 11 Jan: CON - 34% (+4) LAB - 28% (-3) UKIP - 16% (-3) GRN - 8% (+3) LDEM - 8% (-)

National Poll (Populus) 09 - 11 Jan: LAB - 37% (+3) CON - 32% (-1) UKIP - 13% (-1) LDEM - 10% (+2) GRN - 4% (-2)

National Poll (YouGov): 08 - 09 Jan: CON - 32% (-1) LAB - 32% (-1) UKIP - 18% (+5) LDEM - 7% (-1) GRN - 6% (-1)

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From margins to mainstream: the rapid shift in French public opinion

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 17:07

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Visualization

Numbers cannot explain the Charlie Hebdo tragedy, but they can help provide some of the context and clarity needed to better understand complexity. The figures tell us the story of a France that has changed - and has done so rapidly in a relatively short period of time

Analysts trying to find an explanation for an event such as the tragedy that struck the offices of Charlie Hebdo this week would usually start with some relevant data sources. The problem is, France’s census asks no questions of religious adherence, political affiliation and ethnicity, making any analysis of French society that wants to be based on these metrics extremely difficult.

According to estimates though, 8% of France’s population is Muslim.

Ifop : @atlantico_fr 80% des Français jugent la menace terroriste élevée en France pic.twitter.com/0BXHI8h2ri

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People power: voters making a world of difference across the globe in 2015

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 08:00

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Visualization

The significance of ballots in 2015 will be felt around the world – here are 15 elections to watch out for

In 2014 a record 1.5 billion people voted in the more than 100 elections held around the world. This year UK voters aren’t the only ones electing a new government; one third of EU member states will go to the polls, and with important elections due in Asia, Africa and the Americas, the significance of this year’s ballots will be felt around the world.

Here are the 15 elections – more or less in chronological order – to watch out for in 2015:

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Poll finds spike in UK voters' concerns over health

Wed, 01/07/2015 - 12:39

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Visualization

46% of UK voters think health is the most important issue facing the country, up 13 points in one month

The latest YouGov issues tracker, a monthly survey which asks voters to list the issues they think are the most important facing the UK, shows that 46% of Britons feel health is the issue of upmost concern.

Immigration and the economy still top the rankings, but concerns over health are up 13 points since last month. And with the poll’s fieldwork carried out on 5-6 January, the impact of Tuesday’s news that hospital A&E waiting times are on their worst levels since standards were introduced has yet to trickle down into the numbers.

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